Contact us
    home >> femat
Caribbean Disaster Mitigation and Community Empowerment Initiative COMMUNITY-BASED
PRE-DISASTER MITIGATION FOR
COMMUNITY- AND FAITH-BASED ORGANIZATIONS
INSTRUCTOR GUIDE


THESE MATERIALS WERE PREPARED THROUGH A CONTRACT FROM THE FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY (FEMA), THE EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE DIRECTORATE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (DHS). THE MATERIALS ARE BASED ON THE EXPERIENCE AND COUNSEL OF
COMMUNITIES, FAITH-BASED ORGANIZATIONS, AND EMERGENCY MANAGERS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY

Instructor’s Guide

Introduction to Community-Based Mitigation

When it comes to disaster, emergency managers and community-based and faith-based organizations (CBOs
and FBOs) have long operated within certain traditional roles. CBOs and FBOs are accustomed to deploying
volunteers and services in disaster relief and recovery. Food, shelter, blankets, the organization of volunteer
resources, and the provision of human warmth and comfort are their areas of expertise.


Emergency managers typically are focused on emergency operations and technical solutions. They are burdened
with too much to do and too few resources. In many cases, emergency managers have their hands full
maintaining a decent state of preparedness and responding when disaster occurs. They generally work with volunteers in well-defined circumstances during and after disasters.
There is a growing trend around the country for CBOs and FBOs to cooperate with emergency managers in a different kind of partnership.

Community-based mitigation programs concentrate on ongoing efforts that can
lessen the impact disasters have on people and property. These programs capitalize on the distinct and separate
strengths that CBOs/FBOs and emergency managers represent.
CBOs and FBOs offer:


• Immense volunteer capacity
• Understanding of community needs and awareness of the most vulnerable populations
• Built-in credibility with the community
• Access to social and population groups that may avoid interaction with government officials
• The power of persuasion and community influence
• The ability to make decisions outside of government processes
Emergency managers provide access to:
• Funding available through government mitigation grant programs
• Government-based expertise and technical know-how
• Deep understanding of local risks and mitigation needs
• Current status of mitigation within the community
• Access to government expertise and resources at the local, state, regional and federal level
The benefits of CBO/FBO and emergency management partnerships are enormous. They include the following:
• CBO/FBO and emergency management partnerships support the reduction of disaster risk, even in
highly resource-constrained situations.
• Mitigation activities can keep experienced volunteers active and enthusiastic even in times when their
special disaster response and recovery skills are not needed.
• Opportunities exist to bring a whole new group of volunteers into play.
I-1 • Program activities maintain community interest and increase awareness regarding disaster risk
reduction and preparedness.
• Community members acquire a sense of empowerment through reducing their disaster risk. They buy
in at the grassroots level.
• The partnerships and relationships built through such programs further strengthen community bonds.
• When disaster does strike, response and recovery efforts are likely to proceed more smoothly
because people know each other, damage and loss are reduced due to mitigation activities, and
citizens are apt to be more prepared as a result of their increased disaster consciousness.


Both CBOs/FBOs and emergency managers will be challenged by cultural and organizational differences when they step beyond traditional roles to form these new partnerships. Leadership and operational styles may vary widely. The mission of each group will vary distinctly, both within the CBO and FBO community, and between
CBOs/FBOs and emergency managers. For example, CBOs and FBOs are likely to have decision processes
that are less structured and potentially more consensus-based. On the other hand, emergency managers
generally operate within a command-and-control, fairly hierarchical decision-making and leadership framework.


For any partnership to succeed, it is important for each group to understand the cultural values and viewpoints
of their partners, and to honor and respect them.


A Caveat on Community-Based Mitigation Programs


If your community chooses to either establish a community-based mitigation program – or to enhance an existing
partnership between emergency managers and CBOs/FBOs – it’s critical that emergency managers be informed
and brought into the loop as early as possible. Emergency managers are a tremendous resource that should be
tapped to help volunteer groups understand the local natural hazards and how volunteers most successfully and
effectively address outstanding mitigation needs in the community.
Because emergency managers are charged formally with the task of community disaster preparedness,
response, and mitigation, volunteer efforts must dovetail with the official plans either in place or underway.
Volunteer support should be viewed as the asset it is. Failure to involve emergency managers in discussions
could result in misunderstandings or even a situation in which volunteer activities impede progress. Coordination
and solid communication are a must.
CBO and FBO volunteers can achieve optimum results when working in partnership with emergency managers
and in accordance with official Community Mitigation Plans.
Workshop Purpose
The Community-based Pre-Disaster Mitigation for CBOs/FBOs training materials are designed to help CBOs
and FBOs form partnerships with emergency managers to create and sustain community-based mitigation
programs.

 INSTRUCTOR GUIDE TO WORKSHOPS

Sourced from FEMA

 
United Caribbean Trust School Twinning Educate a child Adopt a school Make Jesus Smile Baby Boxes Schooll Prayer NetworkEarly Childhood Music Contact us
 
 
 
Copyright ©  2007 www.UnitedCaribbean.com. All rights reserved. Disclaimer Click to Contact us