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Dominica

Information sourced from wikipedia.org

Dominica is an island nation and borderless country in the Caribbean Sea, the northernmost of the Windward Islands. The size of the country is about 289.5 square miles (754 km²). The capital is Roseau
Dominica

Dominica's pre-Columbian name was Wai'tu kubuli, which means "Tall is her body". The indigenous people of the island, the Caribs, have a territory similar to the Indian reserves of North America. Because the island lies between two French overseas departments, Guadeloupe to the north and Martinique to the south, and because it was colonized by France for a time, it is sometimes called "French Dominica". However, its official language is English, though a French creole is commonly spoken.

Dominica Dominica
Dominica
Dominica

Dominica has been nicknamed the "Nature Isle of the Caribbean" for its seemingly unspoiled natural beauty. It is one of the youngest islands in the Lesser Antilles, still being formed by geothermal-volcanic activity, as evidenced by the world's second-largest boiling lake. The island features lush mountainous rainforests, home of many very rare plant, animal, and bird species. There are xeric areas in some of the western coastal regions, but heavy rainfall can be expected inland. The Sisserou parrot, the island's national bird, is featured on the national flag. Dominica's economy is heavily dependent on both tourism and agriculture.

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Dominica is largely covered by rainforest and is home to the world's second-largest boiling lake. Dominica has many waterfalls, springs, and rivers. Some plants and animals thought to be extinct on surrounding islands can still be found in Dominica's forests. The volcanic nature of the island and the lack of sandy beaches have made Dominica a popular scuba diving spot. Dominica is home to several protected areas, including Cabrits National Park. Dominica has 365 rivers.
Dominica
Morne Trois Pitons National Park is a tropical forest blended with scenic volcanic features Morne Trois Pitons National Park is a tropical forest blended with scenic volcanic features
Morne Trois Pitons National Park is a tropical forest blended with scenic volcanic features

Morne Trois Pitons National Park is a tropical forest blended with scenic volcanic features. It was recognized as a World Heritage Site on April 4, 1995. Within the Caribbean, it shares this distinction with historic World Heritage sites in St. Lucia (2004), Saint Kitts (1999), Hispaniola (Dominican Republic [1990]/Haiti [1982]) and Cuba (multiple).

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Morne Trois Pitons National Park is a tropical forest blended with scenic volcanic features
The Commonwealth of Dominica The Commonwealth of Dominica
Dominica is largely covered by rainforest a

The Commonwealth of Dominica is engaged in a long-running dispute with Venezuela over Venezuela's territorial claims to the sea surrounding Isla Aves (literally Bird Island, but in fact called Bird Rock by Dominica authorities), a tiny islet located 70 miles (110 km) west of the island of Dominica.

The only two major cities are Roseau and Portsmouth.

The Commonwealth of Dominica
The Commonwealth of Dominica  street market The Commonwealth of Dominica  street market
The Commonwealth of Dominica  street market

The flag

The flag's elements have symbolic meanings. The parrot is Dominica's national bird, meant to inspire citizens to soar to achieve their highest goals. In addition to representing the island's parishes, the stars also symbolise hope and equality.

Dominica flag The combined lines form a cross, reflecting Dominica's Christian faith, and the three lines individually represent the Trinity. The flag's colours were also chosen for their associations: green - the island's verdant landscape; red - social justice; yellow - sunshine, agriculture; black - earth, African ancestry; white - clear waters, purity.

The flag, adopted in 1978, features the national bird emblem, the sisserou parrot, which also appears on the coat of arms granted July 21, 1961. This parrot is unique to Dominica. It is an endangered species; only a few pairs remain. The green field represents the lush vegetation of the island. The cross represents the Trinity and the Christian faith, and its 3 colors recall the native Indians, the fertile soil, and the pure water. The 10 stars stand for the 10 parishes (St. Andrew, St. David, St. George, St. John, St. Joseph, St. Luke, St. Mark, St. Patrick, St. Paul, St. Peter) and the red disk for social justice.

The Carib Territory

The former indigenous people of Dominica, the Arawak people, were expelled or exterminated by Caribs in the fourteenth century - click to learn more The former indigenous people of Dominica, the Arawak people, were expelled or exterminated by Caribs in the fourteenth century. The Arawaks had been guided from the waters of the Orinoco River to Dominica and other islands of the Caribbean by the South Equatorial Current. These descendants of the early Tainos were overthrown by the Kalinago tribe of the Caribs.
A  Karbe in the Kalinago Barana Auté - the Carib Village   Kalinago Barana Aut&eacute - the Carib Village
A  Karbe in the Kalinago Barana Aut&eacute - the Carib Village

The Caribs arrived on the island in special boats which they are still making at their own territory on the island. Christopher Columbus arrived at this island on Sunday, November 3, 1493. He and his crew soon left the island, having been defeated by the Caribs.

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The Kalinago Barana Auté honours the diversity, history and heritage of the Kalinago people

The Kalinago Barana Auté

In 1627 England tried and failed to capture Dominica. In 1635 the French claimed the island and sent missionaries, but they were unable to wrest Dominica from the Caribs. The French abandoned the island, along with the island of Saint Vincent, in the 1660s.
The Kalinago Barana Auté honours the diversity, history and heritage of the Kalinago people The Kalinago Barana Auté honours the diversity, history and heritage of the Kalinago people
The Kalinago Barana Auté honours the diversity, history and heritage of the Kalinago people

For the next hundred years Dominica remained isolated, and even more Caribs settled there after being driven from surrounding islands as European powers entered the region. France formally ceded possession of Dominica to the United Kingdom in 1763. The United Kingdom then set up a government and made the island a colony in 1805. The emancipation of African slaves occurred throughout the British Empire in 1834, and, in 1838, Dominica became the first British Caribbean colony to have a Black-controlled legislature. In 1896, the United Kingdom reassumed governmental control of Dominica turning it into a crown colony. Half a century later, from 1958 to 1962, Dominica became a province of the short-lived West Indies Federation. In 1978 Dominica finally became an independent nation.

Click to visit the Carib Village.

 
 
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