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Suriname - Maroons

Permission requested to use infromation from ww.wikipedia.org

The children

When runaway slaves banded together and subsisted independently they were called Maroons. On the Caribbean Islands runaway slaves formed bands and on some islands formed armed camps.

Maroon communities faced great odds to survive against white attackers, obtain food for subsistence living, and to reproduce and increase their numbers.

Many Maroons have now come out of the bush and are living in village reserves.

Many Maroons have now come out of the bush and are living in village reserves.

The communal pipe supplying clean running water
Many Maroons have now come out of the bush and are living in village reserves.
Water catchment
United Caribbean Trust Sports Evangelism Suriname container 2013
 
As the planters took over more land for crops, the Maroons began to vanish on the small islands. Only on some of the larger islands were organized Maroon communities able to thrive by growing crops and hunting. Here they grew in number as more slaves escaped from plantations and joined their bands.
Many Maroons have now come out of the bush and are living in village reserves.
Seeking to separate themselves from whites, the Maroons gained in power and amid increasing hostilities, they raided and pillaged plantations and harassed planters until the planters began to fear a mass slave revolt
The children enjoying the balloons donated by Laurie Dash the Toy Shop in Barbados The children The children
Maroon settlements often possessed a clannish, outsider identity.

Maroon settlements often possessed a clannish, outsider identity. They sometimes developed Creole languages by mixing European tongues with their original African languages. One such Maroon Creole language, in Suriname, is Saramaccan

The Maroons created their own independent communities which in some cases have survived for centuries and until recently remained separate from mainstream society. In the 19th and 20th centuries, Maroon communities began to disappear as forests were razed, although some countries, such as Guyana and Suriname, still have large Maroon populations living in the forests. Recently, many Maroons have moved to cities and towns as the process of urbanization accelerates.
Maroon children
A child collecting water from the pipe
The children enjoying the balloons donated by Laurie Dash the Toy Shop in Barbados
The children enjoying the balloons donated by Laurie Dash the Toy Shop in Barbados
Suriname Bush Negroes In the first half of the 18th century, agriculture flourished in Suriname. Most of the work on the plantations was done by African slaves. The treatment of these slaves was bad, and many slaves escaped to the jungle. These Maroons (also known as "Djukas" or "Bakabusi Nengre") often returned to attack the plantations. Famous leaders of the Surinam Maroons were Alabi, Boni and Broos (Captain Broos).
Suriname Bush Negroes
Suriname Bush Negroes' dwelling
Water everywhere!

They formed a sort of buffer zone between the Europeans who settled along the coast and main rivers, and the unconquered Native American tribes of the inland regions. The Maroons have contributed significantly to the abolition of slavery.

Suriname Bush Negroes' dwelling
The children were excited to receive their gifts.

Recently UCT has been working with Kim Smith to bless these children with underwear.

They were delighted to receive their beautiful gifts.

CLICK to learn more.

Underwear distribution in Suriname
Underwear distribution in Suriname
Underwear distribution in Suriname
 
 
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